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Master of Science in Education – Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track online

Develop your passion for empowering individuals using mental health counseling techniques rooted in theory and practice.

01/03/22 Next Application Due Date
01/24/22 Start Classes
Program Overview

Gain insights into our online M.S. in Education – Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track


$24,480 - $28,800 Total Tuition
As few as 24 months Program Duration
51 - 60 Credit Hours

Solidify your expertise in mental health with advanced competencies and knowledge that lead to new opportunities in the counseling field. Aligned with state law and accreditation standards, the online Master of Science in Education – Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track prepares you for professional practice as a licensed counselor. Choose between the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) option or the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) option to best suit your career goals.

As part of the 100% online coursework designed for both teachers and nonteachers, you will enhance your expertise in three major counseling areas: helping clients work through and prevent personal and interpersonal issues, fostering optimal human development, and remediating existing social-emotional-developmental concerns.

Our expert faculty emphasize current strategies in their instruction that will help you foster therapeutic counselor-client relationships with clients from a variety of backgrounds and cultures. You will also expand your critical thinking and gain real-world experience through internship and practicum courses integrated within the curriculum to help you graduate sooner. Upon completion of this online master's in counseling and passing licensure exam scores, you will be qualified to work as a licensed counselor in Wisconsin and Minnesota.

As a graduate of the MSE in Clinical Mental Health online program, you will:

  • Be prepared to identify and work as a professional counselor who understands the major movements and theories of the counseling profession and how to apply them
  • Plan and implement counseling techniques, methods and treatments to help clients attain goals, and apply group process principles in a variety of counseling settings
  • Utilize and interpret appropriate assessment instruments in order to apply psychometric theory and concepts
  • Possess the ability to plan and implement counseling techniques, methods, and treatment approaches to assist the clients in attaining their treatment goals and apply principles of group processes in a variety of counseling settings
  • Professionally apply your acquired knowledge and skills through intensive professional development in classroom instruction, practicums and an internship

Career outcomes for the MSE in Clinical Mental Health online include opportunities within a wide range of environments, such as:

  • Private Practice
  • Inpatient or Outpatient Treatment Facilities
  • Government and Non-Profit Social Service Agencies
  • Hospitals and Other Healthcare Systems
  • Substance Abuse & Addiction Treatment Centers
  • Nursing and Residential Care Facilities
  • Legal and Correctional Systems

Licensure and Certification

UW-Superior education programs are approved by the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services. As licensure requirements may change without notice, it is your responsibility to confirm the requirements for licensure in your state with your respective licensure board as it applies to the participation in an out-of-state degree program if you seek licensure in a state other than Wisconsin.

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), one of six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

Have questions or need more information about our online programs?

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UW-Superior offers value in a variety of education degree programs online. Check out our other online graduate and post-graduate education programs.

Tuition

Learn more about our value-priced tuition


Tuition cost for the Master of Science in Education – Clinical Mental Health online degree program is the same affordable price for students who reside in-state or out-of-state. To help make the cost more manageable, students pay for each course as they enroll. There is a $56 application fee and a $60 technology fee, but all other fees are included in the total cost of tuition.

$480 Per Credit Hour
$24,480 - $28,800* Total Tuition

View full tuition breakdown

The following is the tuition breakdown for students pursuing a Master of Science in Education – Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track Online:

Program Per Credit Hour* Per Three Credit Hours* Total Tuition*
MSE in Clinical Mental Health – LPC option $480 $1,440 $24,480
MSE in Clinical Mental Health – LPCC option $480 $1,440 $28,800

*Tuition does not reflect technology fee of $60 per course.

Calendar

Know the important dates for our students


For the convenience of our Master of Science in Education – Clinical Mental Health online students, there are multiple start dates each year on the academic calendar. Students should consider application date deadlines, turn in all the required documents, register for classes and pay for tuition for their desired program start date. You can be Superior any time of the year.

01/03/22 Next Application Due Date
01/24/22 Start Classes

View full calendar

At the University of Wisconsin-Superior, we offer multiple start dates to accommodate your schedule. Our calendar includes other important dates to make it easier for you to get started on your program.

Term Start Date Application Deadline Document Deadline Registration Deadline Payment Deadline* Course End Date
2021 Fall I September 6, 2021 August 16, 2021 August 16, 2021 August 30, 2021 September 1, 2021 October 24, 2021
2021 Fall II October 25, 2021 October 4, 2021 October 4, 2021 October 18, 2021 October 20, 2021 December 12, 2021
2022 Spring I January 24, 2022 January 3, 2022 January 3, 2022 January 17, 2022 January 19, 2022 March 13, 2022
2022 Spring II March 21, 2022 February 28, 2022 February 28, 2022 March 14, 2022 March 16, 2022 May 8, 2022

*All payments must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. CST. There will be no exceptions.

Ready to take the next step toward earning your degree online from The University of Wisconsin-Superior?

Admissions

Follow these steps to apply to the online Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track


Factors considered for admission include official documents, a professional resume, and a minimum 2.75 undergraduate GPA.

Baccalaureate degree From a regionally accredited institution
Professional resume And letter of intent
Minimum 2.75 GPA

View all admission requirements

Applicants must meet the following requirements to be eligible for admission:

  • Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75/4.00 or higher on all undergraduate and graduate coursework
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work. We are unable to accept transcripts from students. If you have taken courses at UW-Superior, transcripts are not required.
  • Resume and Letter of Intent addressing:
    1. Service to community
    2. Volunteer work
    3. Commitment to others
    4. Work and professional goals
    5. Areas which the applicant considers to be his or her strengths or weaknesses
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • No GRE or teaching license required
  • Attest to no criminal background
  • Complete criminal background check

View the International Admissions Requirements.

Courses

Read about the online M.S in Education – Counseling, Clinical Mental Health curriculum


In order to earn the Master of Science in Education-Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Track online, students must complete a total of 51 or 60 credit hours, including 13 core courses(42 credit hours), and either 3 track course(9 credit hours) for the LPC option or 4 track courses(12 credit hours) and 2 elective courses(6 credit hours) for the LPCC option.

Expand All [+]

You must complete the following courses.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Analysis of counseling theories and practices. Examines several of the major theories—historic and current—of counseling. Serves as an introduction to the field of counseling and to illustrate the diversity of theoretical approaches which exist. Students develop a preliminary theoretical philosophy of counseling. It is one of three courses (COUN 702, 704, 706) that serves as a foundation to the profession and the program.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be prepared to:

  • Gain understanding of the various counseling theories, the conceptualization of the therapeutic process, and the importance of a theoretical basis
  • Demonstrate perception of the material through participation in activities, class discussions, role plays, written assignments and self-awareness exercises
  • Practice applying aspects of each theory to counseling situations through case studies and peer-counseling exercises
  • Discover personal values, beliefs and attitudes and determine how they relate to the various theories of counseling
  • Develop a personal theory of counseling through the integration of beliefs, knowledge of theories, and current research that can be used in future professional practice

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Overview of the clinical mental health counseling profession and its areas of specialization, training and concern. It examines program development and administration, relevant laws and applications as well as one's professional identity as a counselor. The course covers areas such as prevention, consultation and advocacy. It is one of three courses (COUN 702, 704, 706) that serves as a foundation to the profession and program.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Understand the historical, philosophical, societal, cultural, economic, and political dimensions of clinical mental health counseling
  • Comprehend the professional roles and functions of clinical mental health counselors in various practice settings and the relationships between clinical counselors and other therapeutic professionals
  • Understand how administration of the professional field is handled including managed care, budgets, third party payer system, insurance, administration
  • Identify the professional organizations of the clinical mental health counseling profession
  • Describe the professional credentialing process and the effects of public policy on these issues
  • Understand the typical characteristics of individuals and communities served by a variety of institutions and agencies that offer community and school counseling services
  • Understand the role of diversity and equity issues in clinical and school counseling
  • Develop their professional identity as clinical mental health professional counselors

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Counseling Processes introduces counseling skill development, emphasizing the skills essential in the interview and rapport-building process. Students develop a thorough understanding of the counseling process as well as the role and function of the counselor. Students also develop self-awareness so the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and so the counselor sets and maintains appropriate professional boundaries. Examines ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Possess knowledge related to different counseling techniques and their basis
  • Acquire the ability to utilize different counseling techniques with their clients in a rationale manner
  • Possess an understanding of counselor and client dynamics
  • Possess practical and personal experience of being a counselor, client and observer
  • Have developed a more familiar application of one theory, and the techniques commonly associated with that theory will be demonstrated by the student
  • Demonstrate awareness of cultural diversity and ability to modify counseling strategies as appropriate with culturally diverse populations through role-playing and class discussions
  • Possess knowledge related to the benefits, risks and ethical concerns associated with use of specific techniques

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Introduction to family systems theory and family therapy techniques. Students develop an understanding of the current epistemological base of family system's theory, major contributors and specifically review structural, strategic, behavioral and communications approaches to family counseling. Students review the organization and dynamics of their own families, coming to understand how their families impact their world perceptions and everyday behavior.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will:

  • Develop the ability for reflective thought and use this ability for reflective decision-making for conceptualizing couples and families
  • Demonstrate competence in basic couples and family counseling skills
  • Utilize (identify) the basic intervention techniques in couples and family counseling
  • Examine and demonstrate understanding of several theoretical positions in family counseling
  • Become knowledgeable about the ethical, legal, and professional issues, research, and trends in family therapy
  • Demonstrate understanding of individual and family life cycles and implications for family counseling
  • Develop competencies for working with the diversity of families and their ethnic, racial, gender, language, and socioeconomic values, rules, boundaries, and patterns.
  • Become familiar with current research in professional couple and family counseling journals
  • Develop an individualized approach to counseling which incorporates their strengths and belief systems

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Provides an understanding of theories of vocational choice and vocational development. Students learn methods of evaluating, promoting and enhancing vocational development in individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. They examine ethical and legal considerations inherent in the career counseling process. Also emphasizes student application of traditional and technology-based career assessment techniques. Students participate in experiential activities that focus on the career development of themselves and others.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following areas:

  • Career developmental theories and decision-making models
  • Career, vocational, educational, occupational, and labor market information resources, visual and print media, computer-based career information systems, and other electronic career information systems
  • Career development program planning, organization, implementation, administration, and evaluation
  • Interrelationships among and between work, family, and other life roles and factors including the role of diversity and gender in career development
  • Career and educational program planning, organization, implementation, administration and evaluation
  • Assessment instruments and techniques that is relevant to career planning and decision-making
  • Technology-based career development applications and strategies, including computer-assisted career guidance and information systems and appropriate internet sites
  • Career counseling processes, techniques, and resources, including those applicable to specific populations
  • Ethical and legal considerations specific to the practice of career counseling

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Students conduct an in-depth self-analysis regarding the manner in which counselor and client values, perceptions, attitudes, acculturative experiences, and communication styles impact the counseling process. Students are encouraged to conduct an in-depth cultural self-analysis regarding the issues they have inherited from their own culture as it relates to helping multicultural clients. Furthermore, students learn theories, skills and cross-cultural counseling strategies necessary in working with ethnically and culturally diverse clients. The cross-cultural counseling strategies include both group and individual techniques. Students examine any ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process in regard to clients from a diversity of backgrounds. Designed for counselors already working in the field and current graduate counseling students. Also helpful for any professional who regularly deals with multicultural individuals.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Be introduced to the concept of multicultural counseling and its history, evolution and the current discussion regarding its role in the counseling profession
  • Acquire a deeper appreciation for issues of social justice including how clients might be impacted
  • Be exposed to classic literary works, cinema, professional texts, peer-reviewed journals and current articles in the popular media, all dealing with issues of culture, ethnicity and diversity
  • Have opportunities for self-reflection regarding their own unique cultural and ethnic heritage and journey
  • Have opportunities for critical thought and discourse regarding different perspectives and differences of opinion about the multicultural counseling movement within the professional community
  • Be challenged to examine their own biases, prejudices and presumptions and gain an appreciation for how these might impact the therapeutic relationships

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Provides students with an in-depth knowledge base of clinical mental health counseling diagnosis and treatment planning. Covers the diagnostic process, including differential diagnosis and the use of diagnostic classification systems such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V (DSM-5). Training on administration of intake interview, mental status evaluation, biopsychosocial history, mental health history, and psychological assessment for treatment planning and caseload management; and techniques and interventions related to a broad range of mental health issues. Students will develop clinical writing skills for competence with clients. Treatment planning will focus primarily on cognitive behavioral theory and applied intervention strategies based in outcome research.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Serves the needs of counselors within the area of practice generally referred to as ethics through the guidance of the American Counseling Association (ACA) 2014 Code of Ethics. Assists students in exploring personal values, social expectations/sanctions and professional standards of behavior as it relates to the mental health counseling field. Course seeks to meet the specific state licensure certification and practice needs of the student enrolled.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the language of ethics
  • Consistently use American Counseling Association 2014 professional ethics codes and legal statutes as the foundation for professional endeavors
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose and use of related ethical codes and laws
  • Gain deeper understanding of personal values and beliefs and assess if they are supported by the law, ethical codes, and current professional entities
  • Effectively use a decision-making model to analyze situations and make sound decisions
  • Understand the responsibility and procedures for reporting legal and ethical violations
  • Develop the ability to assess clinical situations involving limits to confidentiality and implement professional procedures in such cases
  • Develop self-care strategies and the ability to recognize and address issues of counselor impairment and burnout

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Assists students in making the transition from theoretical understanding of counseling principles and processes to therapeutic process. Students demonstrate knowledge and skills and refine their knowledge and skills in the following areas: integration of his or her theoretical approach to counseling competence in the basic counseling skills with a focus on individual and group counseling as learned in prior coursework; the ability to identify and assess presenting concerns of clients, diagnose problems and develop treatment plans; and an ability to present case studies and dialogue and consult with other professionals regarding his or her effectiveness as a counselor.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, a Counselor-in-Training (CIT) will be able to:

  • Recognize and value the importance of being a safe, welcoming presence in order to develop a trusting, therapeutic relationship with the client
  • Perceive and conceptualize client concerns by taking into consideration individual differences, socio-cultural factors, developmental processes and biological bases of behavior
  • Effectively negotiate the intake, working and termination stages of the therapeutic encounter and attend to the process of the therapeutic relationship
  • Identify and define treatment goals based on client case conceptualization and diagnosis.
  • Select and employ techniques designed to facilitate movement toward agreed-upon treatment goals, and applying, evaluating and altering these strategies as needed
  • Evaluate therapeutic effectiveness based on the strength of the therapeutic relationship, client goals, symptom reduction and client growth
  • Evaluate counseling practice for cultural sensitivity
  • Cultivate an understanding and appreciation for the roles that social, cultural, economic and political contingencies hold in working with all individuals
  • Practice according to the ethical standards for professional behavior as outlined by the American Counseling Association (ACA)

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Introduction to group counseling, including an understanding of group processes, techniques, role of group members and leaders, ethics, and culture, selected group phenomena, processing of group dynamics and therapeutic movement, application of theory and theoretical techniques. The student is required to form and lead a group using a theoretical orientation and to process the experience through tapes and class discussions.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Apply and demonstrate counseling skills to the practice of group counseling, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments, and quizzes
  • Integrate different theories, techniques, and research with foundational counseling skills and apply these to group counseling
  • Explore a personal counseling style as a group counselor that demonstrates genuineness and respect for all group members in a professional and ethical manner
  • Know professional, ethical, and clinical issues involved in the formation and leading of groups
  • Explore the influence of their own gender, sexuality, culture, ethnicity, class, and religious backgrounds and how their beliefs and attitudes might affect their functioning as group leaders
  • Know group dynamics and methods that facilitate inter-group relations and mediate conflict in both agency/business and school/college

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 6

Experiential course that integrates counseling theory into practical application under supervision. Off-campus professional work sites provide students practical experience while weekly class sessions provide support/supervision for work-site activities. Students' skill integration will be monitored and modified through class discussion, written assignments, class exercises and one-to-one supervision with instructor. This advanced course seeks to finalize professional readiness. Successful completion is dependent on the assumption of the professional functions and obligations of a human service provider. Each internship is an individual placement that is developed related to the professional needs of the student, the needs of the internship site and the coordination by the internship instructor. Student planning to complete in one semester should sign up for 6 credits. Students planning to complete in two semesters should sign up for 3 credits each semester. Instructor consent required

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural and ethical considerations. Instruments covered focus on psychological and intellectual functioning and can generally be administered to clients individually or in groups. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools. Students will be introduced to professional report writing and consequential treatment implications.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and foundational issues of assessment
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of psychological testing, descriptive statistics, validity and reliability, and the relationship of these to the assessment process
  • Have the ability to use assessments to inform decision-making and to assist in developing effective treatment interventions and goal setting
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in professionally responsible practices
  • Demonstrate understanding of various psychological constructs such as intelligence, aptitude, and personality, including strengths and limitations of various assessment instruments
  • Demonstrate the ability to effectively administer, score, interpret, and communicate assessment results
  • Demonstrate skill in conducting an intake interview, mental status exam, biopsychological history, mental health history, and psychological assessment, and use information in treatment planning
  • Demonstrate an awareness of ethical and legal concerns as well as requirements of the assessment process in accordance with the Codes of Ethics and Standards of Practice

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Students develop their understanding of types of program evaluation, consultation and application procedures. This includes, but is not limited to, qualitative and quantitative research, ethical/legal consideration, parametric and nonparametric research methods, principles, practices, applications of needs assessment. Students will consult, conduct and write a literature review; develop a method for data collection, analysis and conclusions; and make recommendations. Student research topics will be in their specific discipline: school counseling, clinical counseling, marital and family therapy or human relations.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will:

  • Know the areas to be addressed during active research and the legal and ethical issues involved
  • Demonstrate how to pose a relevant and realistic research question and a related hypothesis for one’s own research proposal and its defense
  • Demonstrate ability to review and explain research articles, including identifying those that are opinion pieces, advocacy position papers, and non-research supported articles versus those that present their own or others’ sound research to support their findings and ideas
  • Demonstrate strategies for accomplishing data collection in one’s own study that are valid, reliable, ethical, and relevant to the study proposed
  • Demonstrate awareness of Research Ethics in one’s work as to the role of an IRB and why it is needed to carry out human research how participants are protected necessary parts and meaning of an informed consent

For the LPC option, you must complete the following courses.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Surveys the key physical, cognitive, and social-emotional milestones across the life-span, how these interact with an individual's adaptation ability, and the implications for mental health professionals. Focuses on 1) the key concepts of the major theories of development; 2) examination of normal developmental stages across the life-span and the influence of social forces differences in development based on sex/gender, age, class, race, ability, and cultural background; psychosocial adaptation in the school/work, family, and peer systems; and implications for mental health and school counseling professionals. Includes legal and ethical issues and strategies for interventions to enhance development.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Assessment and intervention techniques with individuals and families in which one or more other family members is chemically dependent. Provides an overview of the process of addiction, treatment and recovery approaches, relapse prevention, developmental issues related to addiction and treatment and prevention planning in regard to addiction. Specific techniques to intervene with spouses of alcoholics, children of alcoholics (minor children and/or adults) and extended family members are included. Also reviews the impact of other addictive behaviors on the family.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Study of abnormal behavior, including classification of various disorders, descriptions of causal factors, methods of assessment, prevention and treatment. Includes examining the current diagnostic system, DSM-5. Students develop an awareness of the limitations of the current diagnostic system along with multicultural and ethical considerations. Also teaches students how to integrate results from psychological assessment into the diagnostic process.

For the LPCC option, you must complete the 9 credit hours of LPC courses and choose four (12 credit hours) from the following courses.

Required LPCC Courses(12 credit hours)

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

This course offers: 1) A history of the development and progression of crisis counseling as a specialization in the mental health field, 2) A survey of current crisis counseling models and how they can be applied in a wide range of contexts, 3) Examining the foundation of components of trauma on the stress response system and display, 4) Familiarity with suicide risk assessment, intervention and mandatory reporting, 5) An examination of the intrapersonal and interpersonal impact crises have on people, 6) A discussion on the legal and ethical issues pertaining to crisis and disaster counseling and, 7) An in-depth Family Systems-oriented treatment and application of these principles and standards specifically to families in crisis and how counselors can understand and address the unique dynamics that arise when a family unit faces loss and trauma.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Surveys the key physical, cognitive, and social-emotional milestones across the life-span, how these interact with an individual's adaptation ability, and the implications for mental health professionals. Focuses on 1) the key concepts of the major theories of development; 2) examination of normal developmental stages across the life-span and the influence of social forces differences in development based on sex/gender, age, class, race, ability, and cultural background; psychosocial adaptation in the school/work, family, and peer systems; and implications for mental health and school counseling professionals. Includes legal and ethical issues and strategies for interventions to enhance development.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Assessment and intervention techniques with individuals and families in which one or more other family members is chemically dependent. Provides an overview of the process of addiction, treatment and recovery approaches, relapse prevention, developmental issues related to addiction and treatment and prevention planning in regard to addiction. Specific techniques to intervene with spouses of alcoholics, children of alcoholics (minor children and/or adults) and extended family members are included. Also reviews the impact of other addictive behaviors on the family.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Study of abnormal behavior, including classification of various disorders, descriptions of causal factors, methods of assessment, prevention and treatment. Includes examining the current diagnostic system, DSM-5. Students develop an awareness of the limitations of the current diagnostic system along with multicultural and ethical considerations. Also teaches students how to integrate results from psychological assessment into the diagnostic process.

LPCC Elective Courses(Choose 2 courses for total of 6 credit hours)

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Integrates, at the next level of professional competence, the family theory and family counseling techniques presented in COUN 712 Family Counseling. Assumes students are seeking skill development that will assist in meeting "family counselor" professional certification standards, (state and/or national certifications). Further assumes students have explored their own family issues and will continue to do so through this course, as the course is in part experiential. Students closely review the isomorphic processes reflected within their own familial systems that are reflected in their counseling approach and theory preferences. Students assume the professional functions of a family counselor through current literature, development of professional vita, and exploration of certification. At the successful conclusion of this course, students are assumed to be ready to provide supervised family counseling service.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

While the concept of family seems to be defined and redefined through generational context, the need of the individual to be ""affiliated"" continues to highlight the dyadic relationship's importance to the emotional and social survival of the individual. This course explores intimate dyadic relationships and their importance to the concept of family, family development, and society. Reviews select couple and family dynamics such as basic assumptions of human intimacy (variations), marriage (dissolution and remarriage), mate selection, communications, human sexuality, family crisis, parenting, and aging. Through lectures, experiential exercises, reading, and class discussion, family theory and techniques are integrated and provide conceptualizations toward therapeutic intervention.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Focuses on how the counselor can facilitate self-expression in the counseling context with clients, primarily children, who may have difficulty expressing themselves verbally. Developmental theories and issues that shape children's adjustment to school and to their community form the foundations of the course. Basic solution-oriented brief counseling and consultative techniques are integrated for work with parents and teachers.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Learn to objectively observe behavior, record it, separately suggest several plausible interpretations, and propose ways to assess and to clarify its intent
  • Learn about child development at various ages in the areas of cognition, learning, social skills, language, emotionality, attachment, and self-management
  • Learn to adjust to and relate at a child's developmental level when planning and implementing activities and to compare children at different developmental levels
  • Learn to carry out play/expressive therapy with a child, while observing and developmentally assessing the child's behaviors and ways of experiencing his/her world
  • Learn to experience firsthand many of these techniques and become comfortable with them and their therapeutic potential
  • Learn to understand, through online activities at Child Trauma Academy, the structure and importance of the brain and the effects of trauma on child development
  • Learn to understand ethical and legal restraints when working with children and how to provide information appropriately so that the child gives an informed consent (although it is the parent who formally provides it)

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Behavior management principles applied to mental disorders and to improve learning and behavioral outcomes. Students learn how to apply these principles and techniques to aid individuals in the change process. Students plan, implement and evaluate a self-change project which will demonstrate their understanding of the theory and techniques of behavioral self-management. Students will conduct a functional behavior analysis to develop interventions and/or apply a clinical treatment plan to address client psychopathology.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical background of behavior management including the principles of operant conditioning and how they apply to educational and clinical settings
  • Know how to identify, define, and assess abnormal behavior with a Behavioral Analysis Model
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and the ability to implement group-based contingency programs
  • Demonstrate knowledge of self-control and cognitively based methods of behavior modification
  • Understand current applications of behavioral techniques used for a variety of educational problems, behavioral disorders, as well as everyday concerns in education and clinical mental health settings
  • Demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate a behavior modification plan. (Both a self-management plan and a behavior plan for another person)
  • Understand ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to applied behavior analysis

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Adolescents represent a clientele in transition. This course examines key aspects in their development (biological, cognitive, emotional and social) and their relationships in the various contexts that influence behaviors and attitudes. Common issues of adolescence as well as various interventions are covered from a developmental context. Students learn how to facilitate client self-expression primarily through brief therapeutic techniques and how to consult with supervising adults. While the focus is on normal development, course also touches on at-risk/problematic behavior and thoughts.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of child and adolescent development including appropriate interventions for children and families in the school setting
  • Apply modes, styles, and conventions of communication appropriate to the students’ work and their audience
  • Demonstrate and be able to apply specialized knowledge and skills from within a discipline or field
  • Communicate effectively and persuasively when writing
  • Acquire the tools to continue professional development and contribute to a professional field or discipline
  • Clearly express themselves to achieve a purpose

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

Provides counselors with a contemporary understanding of human sexuality and gender issues, myths, and problems (physical/biological, emotional, social, cultural) for people (married and not) considering, engaging in, and/or ""recovering"" from sexual relationships. Includes interventions and treatment approaches. While the course is a requirement for Marriage and the Family Therapist Licensure, it is open to all interested counseling students.

Duration: 7 weeks   |   Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a survey of current research in cognitive neuroscience on language, memory, learning, perception and other higher cognitive functions. Neurocognition involves learning about the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, along with some coverage of the endocrine system. Presentation of course material is based on typical and atypical development and functioning. Illustrative pathological development and atypical conditions are reviewed as well, such as developmental dyslexia, autistic disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

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