Master of Science in Education — Counseling, School Counseling Track Online

Rise to the forefront of mental health and make a positive impact in students' wellbeing. This online master's program academically prepares you for Wisconsin and/or Minnesota school counselor licensure exams.

Apply by: 6/10/24
Start class: 7/8/24
Apply Now

Program Overview

Discover why our 100% online MSE in School Counseling program stands out

$30,120

Total Tuition

As few as 24 months

Duration

60

Credit Hours

Designed for teachers and nonteachers, the Master of Science in Education – Counseling, School Counseling Track online offers graduate students advanced professional training in the field of counseling at the school or district level and academically prepares them for the Wisconsin and/or Minnesota school counseling licensure exam(s). A teaching license is not required for admission.

As part of the curriculum, you will refine your counseling acumen in three major areas: the prevention of personal and interpersonal problems, fostering optimal human development, and remediating existing social-emotional-developmental concerns among school-age children.

Rooted in both theory and practice, the MSE in School Counseling online program offers you the opportunity to further expand your critical thinking and gain real-world field experience by participating in internship and practicum courses. To meet graduation requirements, you must engage in 600 internship hours within a school (240 of the internship hours must be direct service) and 100 practicum hours. These hours are integrated within the courses to help you meet the required hours faster. Additionally, you must pass the Praxis® Professional School Counselor (5422) exam to graduate. For School Counseling students in the 54-credit hour program, a passing score on the Praxis 5422 Professional School Counselor are required for graduation. For School Counseling students in the 60-credit hour program, a passing score on the Praxis 5422 Professional School Counselor or maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in the program, are required for graduation.

As a graduate of this Higher Learning Commission accredited program, you will:

  • Be equipped to practice ethically and legally in school settings while relying on evidence-based practices in your work with diverse students and families
  • Acquire a thorough understanding of the role of the counselor, essential interview and rapport processes and the ethical and legal considerations inherent to the counseling process and profession
  • Gain the knowledge, skills and expertise necessary to counsel and teach developmental lessons in the classroom that are appropriate to all ages
  • Engage in on-the-job counseling practice with individuals and groups and in the classroom under the guidance of an on-site supervisor and a university faculty supervisor
  • Enhance your counseling acumen and teach to the specific age of children in accordance to the seven Wisconsin DPI Pupil Services Standards
  • Be equipped to practice ethically and legally in school settings while relying on evidence-based practices in your work with diverse students and families
  • Acquire a thorough understanding of the role of the counselor, essential interview and rapport processes and the ethical and legal considerations inherent to the counseling process and profession
  • Gain the knowledge, skills and expertise necessary to counsel and teach developmental lessons in the classroom that are appropriate to all ages
  • Engage in on-the-job counseling practice with individuals and groups and in the classroom under the guidance of an on-site supervisor and a university faculty supervisor
  • Enhance your counseling acumen and teach to the specific age of children in accordance to the seven Wisconsin DPI Pupil Services Standards

Counseling in School Careers:

  • Licensed K-12 school counselor (public, private, charter)
  • Licensed school district counselor
  • Licensed university/college counselor
  • Career counselor
  • Guidance counselor
  • Postsecondary teacher
  • Licensed K-12 school counselor (public, private, charter)
  • Licensed school district counselor
  • Licensed university/college counselor
  • Career counselor
  • Guidance counselor
  • Postsecondary teacher

Licensure and Certification

UW-Superior education programs are approved by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction to fulfill licensure requirements for the state of Wisconsin. As licensure requirements may change without notice, it is your responsibility to confirm the requirements for licensure in your state as it applies to the participation in an out-of-state degree program. If you seek licensure in a state other than Wisconsin, please see the UW-Superior Institutional Certification Office web page for further information and assistance.

UW-Superior education programs are approved by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction to fulfill licensure requirements for the state of Wisconsin. As licensure requirements may change without notice, it is your responsibility to confirm the requirements for licensure in your state as it applies to the participation in an out-of-state degree program. If you seek licensure in a state other than Wisconsin, please see the UW-Superior Institutional Certification Office web page for further information and assistance.

Also available online:

UW-Superior offers value in a variety of education degree programs online. Check out our other online graduate and post-graduate education programs.

$30,120*

Total Tuition

As few as 24 months

Duration

60

Credit Hours

The University of Wisconsin-Superior is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (hlcommission.org), an institutional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

Apply Now

Need More Information?

Call 844-222-2059

Call 844-222-2059

Tuition

Choosing our online program is cost-effective

Tuition cost for the M.S. in Education – Counseling, School Counseling online degree program is the same affordable price for students who reside in-state or out-of-state. To help make the cost more manageable, students pay for each course as they enroll. There is a $56 application fee and a $60 technology, but all other fees are included in the total cost of tuition.

Tuition breakdown:


$30,120*

Total Tuition

$502

Per Credit Hour

Tuition breakdown:


$30,120*

Total Tuition

$502

Per Credit Hour

Calendar

These are the dates you need to know

For the convenience of our M.S. in Education – Counseling, School Counseling online students, there are multiple start dates each year on the academic calendar. Students should consider application date deadlines, turn in all the required documents, register for classes and pay for tuition for their desired program start date. You can be Superior any time of the year.

Now enrolling:


6/10/24

Apply Date

7/8/24

Class Starts
TermStart DateApp & Doc DeadlineRegistration DeadlinePayment DeadlineClass End Date
Summer I5/20/244/22/245/6/245/15/247/5/24
Summer II7/8/246/10/246/24/247/3/248/23/24
Fall I9/9/248/9/248/26/249/4/2410/25/24
Fall II11/4/2410/4/2410/21/2410/30/2412/20/24
Spring I1/21/2512/23/241/7/251/16/253/7/25
Spring II3/17/252/17/253/3/253/12/255/2/25

UW-Superior Refund Schedule:
A student enrolled in this program may receive a 100% tuition refund by day 7 of the term start and a 50% tuition refund by day 14 of the term start. Any questions, please contact the Cashier’s Office at [email protected].

Now enrolling:


6/10/24

Apply Date

7/8/24

Class Starts

Have questions or need more information about our online programs?

Ready to take the rewarding path toward earning your degree online?

Admissions

Find your fit in our online school counseling master’s program

The admissions process is the first step toward earning your online degree. Find out the requirements for the M.S. in Education – Counseling, School Counseling online, what additional materials you should send and where you need to send them.

Admission Requirements:

  • Baccalaureate degree
  • Minimum 2.75 GPA
  • Professional resume

Applicants must meet the following requirements to be eligible for admission:

  • Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75/4.00 or higher on all undergraduate and graduate coursework
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work. We are unable to accept transcripts from students. If you have taken courses at UW-Superior, transcripts are not required.
  • Resume and Letter of Intent addressing:
    1. Service to community
    2. Volunteer work
    3. Commitment to others
    4. Work and professional goals
    5. Areas which the applicant considers to be his or her strengths or weaknesses
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • No GRE or teaching license required
  • Complete criminal background check

View the International Admissions Requirements.

Courses

Learn the degree plan for our School Counseling Curriculum

In order to earn the Master of Science in Education – Counseling, School Counseling Track online, students must complete 19 total courses (60 credit hours), which include 12 core courses (36 credit hours) and seven track courses (24 credit hours). Select courses in this program include synchronous work that must be completed at specific times.

Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of counseling theories and practices. Examines several of the major theories -- historic and current -- of counseling. Serves as an introduction to the field of counseling and to illustrate the diversity of theoretical approaches which exist. Students develop a preliminary theoretical philosophy of counseling. One of three courses -- COUN 702, 704, 706 -- that serve as a foundation to the profession and the program.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be prepared to:

  • Gain understanding of the various counseling theories, the conceptualization of the therapeutic process, and the importance of a theoretical basis
  • Demonstrate perception of the material through participation in activities, class discussions, role plays, written assignments and self-awareness exercises
  • Practice applying aspects of each theory to counseling situations through case studies and peer-counseling exercises
  • Discover personal values, beliefs and attitudes and determine how they relate to the various theories of counseling
  • Develop a personal theory of counseling through the integration of beliefs, knowledge of theories, and current research that can be used in future professional practice
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Counseling Processes introduces counseling skill development, emphasizing the skills essential in the interview and rapport building process. Students develop a thorough understanding of the counseling process as well as the role and function of the counselor. Students also develop self-awareness so the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and so the counselor sets and maintains appropriate professional boundaries. Examines ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Possess knowledge related to different counseling techniques and their basis
  • Acquire the ability to utilize different counseling techniques with their clients in a rationale manner
  • Possess an understanding of counselor and client dynamics
  • Possess practical and personal experience of being a counselor, client and observer
  • Have developed a more familiar application of one theory, and the techniques commonly associated with that theory will be demonstrated by the student
  • Demonstrate awareness of cultural diversity and ability to modify counseling strategies as appropriate with culturally diverse populations through role-playing and class discussions
  • Possess knowledge related to the benefits, risks and ethical concerns associated with use of specific techniques
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Introduction to family systems theory and family therapy techniques. Students develop an understanding of the current epistemological base of family system's theory, major contributors, and specifically review structural, strategic, behavioral and communications approaches to family counseling. Students review the organization and dynamics of their own families, coming to understand how their families impact their world perceptions and everyday behavior.

Learning Outcomes

Skill Development

  • Students will develop the ability for reflective thought and use this ability for reflective decision making for conceptualizing couples and families.
  • Student will demonstrate multicultural/diversity sensitivity.
  • Students will demonstrate competence in basic couples and family counseling skills.
  • Students will utilize (identify) the basic intervention techniques in couples and family counseling.

Knowledge Development

  • Students will acquire knowledge of the history of family therapy.
  • Students will examine and demonstrate understanding of several theoretical positions in family counseling
  • Make reflective decisions concerning family theory, taking into consideration the diverse nature of families (e.g., single-parent families, remarried families, culturally diverse families, etc.).
  • Become knowledgeable about the ethical, legal, and professional issues, research, and trends in family therapy.
  • Students will demonstrate successful understanding of the paradigm shift from linear to circular thinking.
  • Students will demonstrate understanding of individual and family life cycles and implications for family counseling.
  • Students will gain knowledge of theories of healthy and dysfunctional characteristics of families.
  • Students will develop an individualized approach to counseling couples and families that incorporates the strengths and belief systems of the counselor in training.
  • Students will develop competencies for working with the diversity of families and their ethnic, racial, gender, language, and socioeconomic values, rules, boundaries, and patterns.
  • Students will become familiar with current research in professional couple and family counseling journals.

Professional Development

  • Students will demonstrate multicultural sensitivity, knowledge, and competencies.
  • Students will develop ethical principles necessary couples and family therapy with regards to responsibilities, structure, and activities associated with family therapy.
  • Students will research current trends and issues in couples and family therapy.
  • Students will acquire insight, understanding, and ability to use critical thinking regarding self and family of origin.
  • Students will develop an individualized approach to counseling which incorporates their strengths and belief systems.
  • Students will apply family techniques (e.g., family genogram, etc.) and theoretical constructs to one's own family to foster intellectual, social, and personal development with increased insight, understanding, and facility to use critical thinking regarding self and self-reflection in the process of counseling.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers: 1) A history of the development and progression of crisis counseling as a specialization in the mental health field, 2) A survey of current crisis counseling models and how they can be applied in a wide range of contexts, 3) Examining the foundation of components of trauma on the stress response system and display, 4) Familiarity with suicide risk assessment, intervention and mandatory reporting, 5) An examination of the intrapersonal and interpersonal impact crises have on people, 6) A discussion on the legal and ethical issues pertaining to crisis and disaster counseling and, 7) An in-depth Family Systems-oriented treatment and application of these principles and standards specifically to families in crisis and how counselors can understand and address the unique dynamics that arise when a family unit faces loss and trauma."
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Provides an understanding of theories of vocational choice and vocational development. Students learn methods of evaluating, promoting, and enhancing, vocational development in individuals from a diversity of backgrounds. They examine ethical and legal considerations inherent in the career counseling process. Also emphasizes student application of traditional and technology-based career assessment techniques. Students participate in experiential activities that focus on the career development of themselves and others.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following areas:

  • Career developmental theories and decision-making models
  • Career, vocational, educational, occupational, and labor market information resources, visual and print media, computer-based career information systems, and other electronic career information systems
  • Career development program planning, organization, implementation, administration, and evaluation
  • Interrelationships among and between work, family, and other life roles and factors including the role of diversity and gender in career development
  • Career and educational program planning, organization, implementation, administration and evaluation
  • Assessment instruments and techniques that is relevant to career planning and decision-making
  • Technology-based career development applications and strategies, including computer-assisted career guidance and information systems and appropriate internet sites
  • Career counseling processes, techniques, and resources, including those applicable to specific populations
  • Ethical and legal considerations specific to the practice of career counseling
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Surveys the key physical, cognitive, and social-emotional milestones across the life-span, how these interact with an individual's adaptation ability, and the implications for mental health professionals. Focuses on 1) the key concepts of the major theories of development; 2) examination of normal developmental stages across the life-span and the influence of social forces differences in development based on sex/gender, age, class, race, ability, and cultural background; psychosocial adaptation in the school/work, family, and peer systems; and implications for mental health and school counseling professionals. Includes legal and ethical issues and strategies for interventions to enhance development.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Students conduct an in-depth self-analysis regarding the manner in which counselor and client values, perceptions, attitudes, acculturative experiences, and communication styles impact the counseling process. Students are encouraged to conduct an in-depth cultural self-analysis regarding the issues they have inherited from their own culture as it relates to helping multicultural clients. Furthermore, students learn theories, skills and cross-cultural counseling strategies necessary in working with ethnically and culturally diverse clients. The cross-cultural counseling strategies include both group and individual techniques. Students examine any ethical and legal considerations inherent in the counseling process in regard to clients from a diversity of backgrounds. Designed for counselors already working in the field and current graduate counseling students. Also helpful for any professional who regularly deals with multicultural individuals.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Be introduced to the concept of multicultural counseling and its history, evolution and the current discussion regarding its role in the counseling profession
  • Acquire a deeper appreciation for issues of social justice including how clients might be impacted
  • Be exposed to classic literary works, cinema, professional texts, peer-reviewed journals and current articles in the popular media, all dealing with issues of culture, ethnicity and diversity
  • Have opportunities for self-reflection regarding their own unique cultural and ethnic heritage and journey
  • Have opportunities for critical thought and discourse regarding different perspectives and differences of opinion about the multicultural counseling movement within the professional community
  • Be challenged to examine their own biases, prejudices and presumptions and gain an appreciation for how these might impact the therapeutic relationships
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Study of abnormal behavior, including classification of various disorders, descriptions of causal factors, methods of assessment, prevention and treatment. Includes examining the current diagnostic system, DSM-5. Students develop an awareness of the limitations of the current diagnostic system along with multicultural and ethical considerations. Also teaches students how to integrate results from psychological assessment into the diagnostic process.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Serves the needs of Counselors within the area of practice generally referred to as ethics, through the guidance of the American Counseling Association (ACA) 2014 Code of Ethics. Assists students in exploring personal values, social expectations/sanctions and professional standards of behavior as it relates to the mental health counseling field. Course seeks to meet the specific state licensure certification and practice needs of the student enrolled.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the language of ethics
  • Consistently use American Counseling Association 2014 professional ethics codes and legal statutes as the foundation for professional endeavors
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose and use of related ethical codes and laws
  • Gain deeper understanding of personal values and beliefs and assess if they are supported by the law, ethical codes, and current professional entities
  • Effectively use a decision-making model to analyze situations and make sound decisions
  • Understand the responsibility and procedures for reporting legal and ethical violations
  • Develop the ability to assess clinical situations involving limits to confidentiality and implement professional procedures in such cases
  • Develop self-care strategies and the ability to recognize and address issues of counselor impairment and burnout
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Introduction to group counseling including an understanding of group processes, techniques, role of group members and leaders, ethics, and culture, selected group phenomena, processing of group dynamics and therapeutic movement, application of theory and theoretical techniques. The student is required to form and lead a group using a theoretical orientation, and to process the experience through tapes and class discussions.

Learning Outcomes

The goal of the class is for you to achieve an effective working understanding of group dynamics and processes that is integrated and that allows you to apply and to practice skills, knowledge, theory, and interpersonal and leadership abilities with relative success and, in the process, for you to grow professionally. The class follows the ethical guidelines for best practices from the Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGA, ACA).

  • The student will apply and demonstrate counseling skills to the practice of group counseling, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments, and quizzes.
  • The student will integrate different theories, techniques, and research with foundational counseling skills and apply these to group counseling, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments and quizzes.
  • The student will explore a personal counseling style as a group counselor that demonstrates genuineness and respect for all group members in a professional and ethical manner, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments and quizzes.
  • The student will critically evaluate, compare and experience a variety of group counseling theories and techniques, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments and quizzes.
  • The student will review and apply research findings on group theory and practice to their own academic and clinical work, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments and quizzes.
  • The student will know professional, ethical, and clinical issues involved in the formation and leading of groups, as evidenced through practice in class, facilitation outside of class, as well as through discussion of readings, assignments and quizzes.
  • The student will identify, describe, and experience the developmental stages of group process, as assessed through class discussion, readings and quizzes.
  • The student will identify and practice various group leadership skills and techniques by taking turns as the group facilitator in class, through facilitation outside of class and by reflecting on leadership in written assignments.
  • The student will explore their own personal feelings and issues that could potentially interfere with their effectiveness as group leaders and identify ways of containing and processing such issues as needed, as evidenced through journal entries, class discussions, supervision with the instructor as well as through participating in their own personal counseling, when warranted.
  • The student will explore the influence of their own gender, sexuality, culture, ethnicity, class, and religious backgrounds and how their beliefs and attitudes might affect their functioning as group leaders through journals, class discussions, assignments and supervision with the instructor.
  • The student will know group dynamics and methods that facilitate inter-group relations and mediate conflict in both agency/business and school/college sites through reading the assignments and engaging in class discussions and journal writings.
  • The student will know how to use communication skills to help clients develop positive,
  • supportive relationships with teachers/instructors, peers, families and coworkers, as practiced through class experiences, discussions, group leadership, and assignments.
  • The student will display a basic ability to access relevant research studies, using current
  • electronic search technologies, and to critique current counseling literature and research. This will be assessed through class discussion of course readings and written assignments.
  • The student will utilize graduate-level writing skills, following the guidelines recognized as standard in the counseling profession, established by the American Psychological Association. This will be assessed through written assignments.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Addresses the study of measurement theory and basic statistics needed for understanding assessment. Also focuses on general test construction, appropriate instrument selection with awareness of limitations, multicultural and ethical considerations. Instruments covered focus on psychological and intellectual functioning and can generally be administered to clients individually or in groups. Students experience the administration, interpretation and reporting of a select sample of assessment tools. Students will be introduced to professional report writing and consequential treatment implications.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and foundational issues of assessment.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of psychological testing, descriptive statistics, test validity / reliability, and the relationship of these to the assessment process.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use assessments to inform decision making and to assist in developing effective treatment interventions and goal setting.
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in professionally responsible practices.
  • Demonstrate understanding of various psychological constructs such as intelligence, aptitude, and personality, including strengths and limitations of various assessment instruments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of assessment issues related to diverse populations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to effectively administer, score, interpret, and communicate assessment results.
  • Demonstrate skill in conducting an intake interview, mental status exam, biopsychological history, mental health history, and psychological assessment, and use information in treatment planning.
  • Demonstrate skill in composing detailed and professionally written reports.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of ethical and legal concerns as well as requirements of the assessment process in accordance with the Codes of Ethics and Standards of Practice.
Duration: 7 weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Students develop their understanding of types of program evaluation, consultation and application procedures. This includes, but is not limited to, qualitative and quantitative research, ethical/legal consideration, parametric and nonparametric research methods, principles, practices, applications of needs assessment. Students will consult, conduct and write a literature review, develop a method for data collection, analysis, conclusions and make recommendations. Student research topics will be in their specific discipline; school counseling, clinical counseling, marital and family therapy or human relations.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the areas to be addressed during active research and the legal and ethical issues involved.
  • Demonstrate how to pose a relevant and realistic research question and a related hypothesis for one’s own research proposal and its defense.
    • Present the important and relevant limitation, delimitations, and assumptions of the proposed research and how these influence the utility of the proposed research finding.
  • Demonstrate the ability to present one’s first three chapters in a clearly articulated manner that builds a logical argument for the proposed research based on the published and peer reviewed research.
    • Demonstrating how a rational argument is developed across all 3 chapters.
  • Demonstrate mastery of APA Style in their final draft of the first 3 chapters, the reference list, and the appendices.
  • Demonstrate ability to review and explain research articles, including identifying those that are opinion pieces, advocacy position papers, and non-research supported articles versus those that present their own or others’ sound research to support their findings and ideas.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of different types of research designs.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of data collection methods in published articles that show validity, reliability, accountability.
    • Demonstrate ability to present analysis and findings of others’ research in an unbiased, non-plagiarized fashion using one’s own words.
    • While at the same time omitting personal experiences and interpretations that go beyond the points of the articles.
  • Demonstrate strategies for accomplishing data collection in one’s own study that are valid, reliable, ethical, and relevant to the study proposed.
  • Demonstrate awareness of Research Ethics in one’s work as to the role of an IRB and why it is needed to carry out human research how participants are protected necessary parts and meaning of an informed consent.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Overview of essential school counseling services and the role and function of the school counselor with emphasis on developing, and managing, and evaluating a comprehensive counseling program within the realms of an entire school. Covers the seven pupil services content standards and additional information pertaining to the other members of the pupil service team with whom the counselor works. Integrates special education, technology, legal and ethical issues.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Establish an understanding of the role of a school counselor within the framework of a comprehensive guidance model
  • Gain an understanding of the importance of multicultural school counseling and services to At-Risk, SPED, and LGBT students
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the Wisconsin DPI Content Guidelines for School Counselors
  • Create an understanding of PBIS and the Response to Intervention (RTI) models in order to promote student success
  • To provide information about various educational professionals, including school psychologists, administrators, school counselors, and others
  • Promote importance of self and program evaluation/supervision
  • Address leadership skill development specifically for school counselors, understanding the unique responsibility of position
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Focuses on how the counselor can facilitate self-expression in the counseling context with clients, primarily children, who may have difficulty expressing themselves verbally. Play Therapy History; seminal or historically significant theories; skills and methods; and cultural and social diversity topics will be covered.

Learning Outcomes

  • Learn to objectively observe behavior, to record it, to separately suggest several plausible interpretations, and to propose ways to assess and to clarify its intent.
  • Learn about child development at various ages in the areas of cognition, learning, social skills, language, emotionality, attachment, and self-management.
  • Learn to adjust to and relate at a child's developmental level when planning and implementing activities and to compare children at different developmental levels.
  • Learn to carry out play/expressive therapy with a child, while observing and developmentally assessing the child's behaviors and ways of experiencing his/her world.
  • Learn to try out some solution-focused techniques with a young person [directly or by using puppets or other manipulatives].
  • Learn to understand text chapters (Henderson and Oaklander) and their ideas in a professional manner: that is with group discussions that cover the key points and that relate the material to other areas of focus, such as child development, gender/race/class intersections.
  • Learn to experience first hand many of these techniques and become comfortable with them and their therapeutic potential, no matter what one's age.
  • Learn to understand, through online activities at Child Trauma Academy, the structure and importance of the brain and the effects of trauma on child development.
  • Learn to understand ethical and legal restraints when working with children and how to provide information appropriately so that the child gives an informed consent (although it is the parent who formally provides it).
  • Learn to reflect on the above and how these integrate into an overall approach to counseling.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Adolescents represent a clientele in transition. This course examines key aspects in their development (biological, cognitive, emotional, and social) and their relationships in the various contexts that influence behaviors and attitudes. Common issues of adolescence as well as various interventions are covered from a developmental context. Students learn how to facilitate client self-expression primarily through brief therapeutic techniques and how to consult with supervising adults. While the focus is on normal development, course also touches on at-risk/problematic behavior and thoughts.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of child and adolescent development including appropriate interventions for children and families in the school setting
  • Apply modes, styles, and conventions of communication appropriate to the students’ work and their audience
  • Demonstrate and be able to apply specialized knowledge and skills from within a discipline or field
  • Communicate effectively and persuasively when writing
  • Acquire the tools to continue professional development and contribute to a professional field or discipline
  • Clearly express themselves to achieve a purpose
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Behavior management principles applied to mental disorders and to improve learning and behavioral outcomes. Students learn how to apply these principles and techniques to aid individuals in the change process. Students plan, implement, and evaluate a self-change project which will demonstrate their understanding of the theory and techniques of behavioral self management. Students will conduct a functional behavior analysis to develop interventions and/or apply a clinical treatment plan to address client psychopathology.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, learners will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical background of behavior management including the principles of operant conditioning and how they apply to educational and clinical settings
  • Know how to identify, define, and assess abnormal behavior with a Behavioral Analysis Model
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and the ability to implement group-based contingency programs
  • Demonstrate knowledge of self-control and cognitively based methods of behavior modification
  • Understand current applications of behavioral techniques used for a variety of educational problems, behavioral disorders, as well as everyday concerns in education and clinical mental health settings
  • Demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate a behavior modification plan. (Both a self-management plan and a behavior plan for another person)
  • Understand ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to applied behavior analysis
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Developing the knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to teach developmental lessons in the classroom that are appropriate to all ages. Covers classroom management. Students, using the ASCA and Wisconsin Developmental Models, develop a set of lessons (perhaps based on monthly themes) specific to the ages of the children they intend to counsel. Emerging problems in the schools, such as bullying, sexual harassment, and abuse are covered. Class covers the 10 WDPI Teacher and Pupil Services Standards.

Learning Outcomes

  • Understand the role and function of the counselor within the school setting.
  • Understand the essential features of a comprehensive developmental guidance program as an integral part of the total educational program.
  • Apply counseling techniques and effective communication strategies that will enhance the ability to work effectively with students, teachers, administrators, parents, and others.
  • Understand the developmental needs of students and their families, the importance of age appropriate classroom guidance activities, and strategies to assist parents and students during points of educational transition.
  • Identify issues which affect the successful functioning of school aged children and develop the ability to plan effective interventions.
  • Identify and discuss ethical and legal issues directly related to school counseling.
  • Discuss strategies for developing and implementing crisis intervention plans.
  • Identify community services available to assist school counselors in providing comprehensive services to students.
  • Create an effective classroom management plan that can be used when delivering developmental guidance lessons.
  • Integrate the components of lesson design into effective developmental guidance lessons.
  • Demonstrate effective teaching strategies when delivering developmental guidance lessons for students in a K-12 setting.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 3
Assists students in making the transition from theoretical understanding of counseling principles and processes to therapeutic process. Students demonstrate knowledge and skills and refine their knowledge and skills in the following areas: integration of his or her theoretical approach to counseling competence in the basic counseling skills with a focus on individual and group counseling as learned in prior coursework; the ability to identify and assess presenting concerns of clients, diagnose problems, and develop treatment plans; and an ability to present case studies, dialogue, and consult with other professionals regarding his or her effectiveness as a counselor.
Duration: 7 Weeks weeks
Credit Hours: 6
Field-based course providing on-the-job practice in counseling with individuals and groups and in the classroom under the guidance of an on-site supervisor and a university faculty supervisor. Weekly group discussions of cases and sharing of work experiences is at the heart of the campus classes. Particular content areas that enhance professional preparation (such as legal and ethical issues, standards, technology) are covered. Students are expected to share their counseling work weekly for supervision and peer review. Counseling portfolios are completed and readied for submission. A student planning to complete this course in one semester should sign up for 6 credits. Students planning to complete the course in two semesters should sign up for 3 credits each semester. Instructor consent required.

Learning Outcomes

  • Experience the work environment and functions of a professional school counselor (with professional supervision) through practical experiences in multiple aspects of “school- based methods” of counseling including individual, group, classroom, consultation, assessment and evaluation, and school leadership.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the skills required to collaborate with educators, families, and community resources to develop, organize, administer, evaluate and promote a comprehensive developmental school counseling program.
  • Examine how schools use best practice to respond to crises, safety and health needs, at- risk students, diversity, inclusion, and issues that impact students’ achievement, personal/social and career development.
  • Demonstrate individual and group counseling skills that facilitate students’ personal/social, academic, and career development.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of relevant state and federal laws, regulations, and standards including the ethical standards of the American School Counselor Association.
  • Demonstrate the ability to utilize research, student data, and institutional assessments to improve school counseling programs.
  • Participate in the process of group supervision by presenting and critiquing case examples.
  • Participate in the process of individual supervision by participating in on-site and university supervision meetings and receiving at least 2 written evaluations by the site supervisor.
  • Demonstrate communication skills by facilitating collegial discussions of professional topics.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of developmental approaches that assist all students by creating and presenting a developmental guidance unit.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to professionalism by acquiring a minimum of 600 hours of supervised practicum as a school counselor and by showing professional and ethical development and life-long learning.
  • Demonstrate a readiness for licensure in the practice of school counseling by creating and presenting a professional portfolio.

Request Information

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
or call 844-222-2059

Begin Application Process

Start your application today!
or call 844-222-2059 844-222-2059

for help with any questions you may have.